Saturday, August 17, 2013

The Domino Effect

This business of "one thing leads to another" is a common theme around here, and this is just the latest example of it.

There I was, painting the trim around the transom window above the front door when I looked down inside the storm window covering it and noticed a chunky piece of beautiful trim.  "It's too bad that's hidden by the storm window...." I thought.  And then, almost before I even finished that thought, came an idea:  Why not pull the storm window off there? The transom hardware on the inside is long gone, and the window's sealed shut by about a thousand coats of paint, so it's not like the storm window really had any purpose.

So I removed it.

Then I stepped back and looked at the front door and thought, "Well, now the storm door looks really dorky without the storm window above it."  I hate that storm door with a passion, always have.  It's aluminum and really flimsy, the screen panels for it are gone, and one of the glass panels has been replaced with plexiglass.  "Guess I better keep it though," I sighed, "since I don't have the money for one of those full-view glass doors right now."  So I painted it.  And that storm door bugged me for the rest of the day.  Towards dark I gave myself a little talk. "Hell's Bells, you took the storm windows off every window on the entire house and despite the dire predictions of the haters, it didn't cause the utility bills to soar.  The damn door doesn't fit in the frame anyhow, so it's hardly energy efficient.  Besides, if you take the storm door off then you can see the front door."  (Talking to myself like this might be part of the reason why the neighbors think I'm nuts.  That, and painting my whole house by myself.)

So I removed the storm door, too.  Because it really did look dorky on there.

And now everybody can see the front door, which is the best part of my house.  

(Everybody can also see my arm and the top of my head in the reflection, which is not the best part of my house!)  

Looking at it, I realized that the strip of wood above the door (it's gray in the above photo) wasn't original to the house and was put there when the storm door was.  My son had stopped by when he saw the storm door out in the yard, so he removed that little piece of wood for me.  

Then it occurred to me that without a storm door, the post office would be willing to use the mail slot in my door, so I took the mailbox off the front of the house too.

A doorknob and backplate this gorgeous should not be hidden behind a storm door, am I right?

Here you can also see the paint history of the trim:  white (me), cream (me too), bright yellow, gray, and dark blacky-green.

A better photo of the front door.

(Note the icky storm door in the reflection.)

Twenty-four hours later, I took this photo...and realized I'd come full circle.  Painted trim, removed storm window, removed storm door, removed trim piece, removed mailbox, and now back to painting trim again.

Is it any wonder it takes forever for me to get things done?



28 comments:

  1. Serendipity
    I love it. Great old door. Now revealed, I am sure your door feels free and ready to be admired.
    What a delightful surprise. That surely motived you to press on.

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  2. I would just pull up a chair, and sit there for some time admiring that door.

    Are you sure the post office will use the mail slot? Some places they only do curbside delivery. Not sure where the removed mail box was...

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    1. Karen Anne, the mailbox was just to the left of the front door. I asked yesterday if they'd use the mail slot, and the mail carrier said yes. Hooray!

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  3. Your door is lovely, I don't remember noticing it before (so you obviously did the right thing by removing the storm)! I'm cracking up right now, because I did the exact same thing when I moved in here, except I have yet to remove that extraneous middle trim (and my doors are no where near as pretty as yours) . . .

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    1. Thanks! The door was pretty much covered up by that ugly storm door, so I'm glad I did it. I need to put some Feed & Wax on the front door to get it looking its best.

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  4. You did good.

    I can't wait to see a photo of the entire front of the house with the door now exposed.

    Painted house numbers in the transom might be cool.

    Keep up the good work.

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    1. Jan, Painted house numbers in the transom! YES! What a great idea.

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  5. What's under the paint on that transom? Is it the same age as the door?

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    1. Karen Anne, I imagine it has the same paint history. It's original to the house, too, as far as I know. I painted it black because all the transoms, inside and out, were originally painted black, but now I'm thinking I liked it better white...

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    2. Could the transom be stripped and stained to match the door?
      Might give the door even more pop.

      Also I think you can get those numbers in decal form (saw iton Curb Appeal) and they afix on the inside of the glass.

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    3. I looked at the photo again and on second thought, nix the stripping idea.

      The door looks fabulous.

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    4. Oooohhhhhh....look at these: http://www.housenumberlab.com/grant/

      I love both those fonts. The 22K numbers would be--gulp!--$168.00. Cha-ching! The etched ones are $72.00.

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    5. http://www.historichouseparts.com/pdshop/shop/item.aspx?itemid=10099

      Scroll down to see how they look installed.

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  6. Now you're makin' me think hard about my storm door (which I also hate).....See what you got started?

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  7. Is the brass doorplate used throughout the whole house? The ones in my house are.

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    1. Sadly, all of the original doorknobs and backplates are gone except for that one. :(

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  8. Love the door!!! We used to have a mail slot at our first house. We could always tell when we had a substitute mailman. Our mail would be slobbered up. Our dog would fight the mailman putting the mail through the slot. LOL (The regular mailman put a milkbone through first.)

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    1. What a great story about the milkbone! I love it!

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  9. Best. Move. Ever. So what if cool air drifts in, it's so worth it! You may want to search for a good wood cleaner and exterior wood finish to protect it from the elements.

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    1. Thanks, Milah! I need to put something (probably Feed & Wax) on the door so it looks better and it's protected.

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  10. I LOVE that front door. Sadly my Cape Cod has boring ugly flat doors. The only nice doors are in the basement.

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    1. Julie, you could paint your boring flat doors a fun color!

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  11. Oh my goodness! What a beautiful door! You did the right thing!

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  12. Letters-Decals.com has 4" decals as low as 54 cents each. I got them for our rental's transom that I got on craigslist after ripping out crap and realizing a transom belonged! Domino effect!
    Margaret

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    1. Thanks for the info, Margaret, I'll have to check that out. I'm really thinking about putting house numbers on the transom.

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