Wednesday, March 20, 2013

Every Day I'm Shufflin'

For weeks now I've been trying to decide whether or not I should move my bedroom, and if so, where.  (Where in this house, I mean; another house or outdoors just won't work.)  My family and a couple of friends have weighed in and I still can't make up my mind, so now I'll get all y'all involved in the discussion.

The scrawly light gray lines are windows.  The light gray boxes are closets,
and they really do stick out in the room like that.
Click on the photo to embiggen.
I drew up this floor plan so y'all can see what I'm talking about.  Yes, even though it looks like a six-year-old did it, it's really my, ahem, artistry.  Some of the proportions aren't quite right, but you get the idea.

I'll take you on a little written tour of the three bedrooms and lay out the good stuff and the bad stuff with each one.

The back parlor/front bedroom:  At the front of the house just "behind" the entryway.
Good stuff:  Nice big room, pretty fireplace (originally coal-burning, now non-working), great big closet, linen press next to the fireplace for storage, not too much light for day sleeping.
Bad stuff:  Not much wall space, so the only place the bed can go is in the front corner (lower left corner in the floor plan); it's kinda noisy, being at the front of the house.

The middle bedroom:  Where my bedroom is now.
Good stuff: Has attached full bath, has a small closet, and is probably the most quiet of the three bedrooms.  It also gets a lot of light from the big window (30"x84"), the window in the porch door, and the four transom windows.
Bad stuff:  No wall space, like maddeningly so.  This bedroom has five doors ( five!) not counting the closet.  The widest wall in the room is the kitchen/bedroom wall, which is about 3 inches wider than my queen-sized bed.  No room for a nightstand or even the tiniest of little tables unless I block the closet door.  Weirds me out that my bedroom has a door to the outside.  Too bright for day sleeping.

The back bedroom:  Part of the post-1910 addition to the house.
Good stuff: Attached full bath, small closet, more options for arranging furniture.  My bed could go against the east wall (bottom wall of the floor plan) long-wise, or with the head of the bed against that wall, or even at an angle in the corner (lower right corner of the floor plan), or with the head of the bed centered on the west (top) wall.
Bad stuff:  Smallest of the three bedrooms; needs the most work.  Also known as The Room of Shame because it's essentially a storage unit.

So there you have it.  From a renovation standpoint, all three rooms need some work, so that's not a huge consideration in the making up of my mind.  (Although of the three, the back bedroom clearly needs the most work.)  What would you do if you were me?  Which room would you move to, or would you stay put?



14 comments:

  1. What do you do about day sleeping if the current room is too light?

    How much of a privacy issue is that door(?) in the entryway to that back parlor bedroom?

    With the middle bedroom, you could get more wall space by closing in the door between it and the kitchen. I did that with the second bedroom in my old house. You might even close in the door between it and the third bedroom if it's workable to have the third bedroom accessed only through its bathroom.

    Weird side porch: A bedroom in my old house had a side entryway, why I have no idea. I put a bureau across that door, more or less turning it into a window, and a shade on the door pulled half way down to the bureau top. The bureau top was a fav place for my cat to hang out and observe the world.

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    1. Karen, I have thick paper taped over the transoms (ugly solution, but it works), blackout curtains over the big window and the window in the door, and I leave the doors closed. I also wear a sleep mask--if I can find it. For some reason, the dog loves to chew on it.

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  2. The back parlor/front bedroom: What about closing up to of the doorways. That would give you more wall space and privacy.

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    1. Donna, I can close the doors, but I'm loathe to alter anything original to the house, so the doorways will have to stay. I could close them and put furniture in front of them, like Karen Anne suggested.

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    2. The reason I didn't have a qualm, I just realized, about suggesting the door between the kitchen and bedroom be closed in is in my old house, the door had already been moved.

      The house was from about 1920, and the kitchen had been unbelievably remuddled in maybe the 1940s, and you could tell from sighting along the wall that the door had been in a different location previously. It was also one of the less nice "secondary part of the house" doors, not one with the nice woodwork of the living room/dining room.

      I would really like to know what the kitchen in that house had looked like originally, sigh.

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    3. I have so many things I wish I knew about this house! Like, where was the kitchen originally? Why is there a stovepipe hole in the wall of what's now my bedroom? When was the side porch added? When were those back rooms added?

      Sigh.

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  3. The shades I had let quite a bit of light through, so even with them part way down for privacy the bedrooms didn't turn into caves. I'm slowly getting shades for my current house, in ecru cotton. Below is the only source for old fashioned shades I know of. They do a good job, but cost an arm and a leg:

    http://www.annwallace.com/catalog/RollerShades.html

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    1. Gosh, I love those shades. I've seen some DIY versions that look pretty good, but not like those. I think my neighbors have those, or some awfully similar.

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  4. I'd be inclined to keep the back parlor all to myself, closing the door to the entry (would that help cut down noise?), and perhaps centering the bed on that wall. Beautiful fireplace, dark, nice closet - sounds perfect as long as not having an attached bath isn't an issue. Of course now I'm going to dig through your archive to see all the rooms . . . .

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    1. It is a really pretty room, and I think it originally was a bedroom and not a parlor, or at least not a formal parlor. The trim in the "public" rooms of the house--front parlor, entryway, dining room--is more ornate than the trim in the bedrooms and the kitchen.

      Why didn't I think to put pics of the rooms in this post???

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  5. I vote for making the "Room of Shame" your bedroom. Just that... the bed and one dresser. 1) Bathroom close, 2) only two windows to make darkened for sleeping... and maybe you could use your bed to help block some of that light 3)... use armoirs, the closet, and whatever in the middle bedroom to keep clutter minimized. Your bedroom would then be more private as you could close access on both sides and make the room designated for sleeping as being one of the two preferable activities for such a room. (smile) One current trend of thought that is the more we use our bedrooms for other activities (tv, reading, exercise and whatever); when it comes time to zone out, we are missing out. The middle bedroom seems to have lots of doors and access so are you really "private" in it as your bedroom? How do most of your guests access that full bath? Maybe a small sitting area with a book shelf would give you a reading area there to relax in, just before you could stumble to bed. If noise is a major factor, or cold walls, would blown-in insulation be possible from outside while you are scrapping/painting, or inside then repair the holes? Good luck, you are brave to ask the masses to chime in!

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    1. Brilliant! The only bedroom furniture I have is a bed, a chest of drawers (do people still call it that?), a little nightstand and a cedar chest. I measured and it would all fit into the Room of Shame. Cozy and cute. Right now people have to walk through my bedroom to use the bathroom--that bathroom, ugly as it is, still gets used more than the back bathroom I just re-did--which isn't great.

      Charlie said last fall that we should've blown in insulation as we were going along with painting the house. I could still do that. I hadn't thought of putting insulation from the inside in the back of the house. Duh. No original plaster to contend with back there. I should have done that before I papered the laundry room! Can't see the forest for the trees...

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    2. One more concern... if you want cross breeze in the summer months, is that possible, or do you have AC?

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    3. I have AC, but I like to have the windows open when it's not too hot or too cold because I like the fresh air. This house is great for cross breezes...if only most of the windows weren't painted shut. I'm working on that.

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