Wednesday, November 21, 2012

Brilliant

This month my friends and I have been doing "Thirty Days of Thankful", but instead of giving thanks for what we consider the big things, like family and faith and good friends and such, we've been giving thanks for ordinary things that we tend to take for granted.  Hence, my list has things on it like furnaces and internet access and replacement window glass.  (For real, glass is on my list.)  And really, the fact that we take those things for granted is, in itself, something to be grateful for when much of the rest of the world doesn't have regular access to them.

Anyhow, today I'm thankful for one of the things that ought to be on my list but isn't:  beadboard wallpaper.   Yup.  Wallpaper that looks surprisingly like the real thing.  It's brilliant.  Of course it costs less than the real thing (about $25 or so for a roll), and it's so much easier to put up than beadboard.  Even easier than those big sheets of what Mare calls beadboard plywood.  He's a restoration purist and won't call that stuff beadboard.  He'd have apoplexy over this.

I looked at a couple of different brands of it, and what I recommend is the allen + roth brand that's sold at Lowe's.  It's fairly thick and seems more durable than the other brands.  It also looks more like the real stuff than some of the other brands.  The walls in my bathroom were a mess.  Some previous owner had used vinyl flooring as wainscoting.  Ick.  When I took off that ugliness, the walls underneath were drywall that had never been taped and mudded.  I'm not sure exactly what happened in this room, because the top third or so of the walls seems to be plaster, but everything below that is drywall.  If you look closely at the photo, you can see the horizontal line under the wallpaper where plaster meets drywall.  Baffling.  The beadboard wallpaper is thick enough to cover most of that mess.  I'm seriously thinking about covering the yucky paneling in my laundry room with beadboard wallpaper.

But first, I have to finish this room.  The wallpaper isn't painted yet (it comes bright white like that, and it looks nice enough that you really could leave it that way) and I need to put up some chair rail too.  Then I need to finish painting the ceiling (which is also wallpapered, with stuff that looks a bit like tin ceiling) and put in the new vanity and hang the towel rod back up.  Oh yeah, and I need to finish that stenciled floor.  Still tapping away at that...

14 comments:

  1. I really like that paper, thinking about doing that in my spare bedroom.

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  2. I didn't even know there WAS such a thing! Cool.

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  3. I read some of the reviews at the Lowe's site. Did you find this was fragile? It sounds like it would dent if someone leaned against it, from the way some people were carrying on.

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  4. If you think beadboard wallpaper is bad, wait till you've seen what we found in our gazebo!

    Knotty Pine wallpaper!
    http://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b82/W_e_St/Wenzel/IMGP2505.jpg

    The gazebo is actually just an old shed built against a brick wall. 1/3 of the shed had an original wooden wall, the rest was brick only. The genius previous owner covered the exposed brick with styrofoam and wallpaper.

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  5. Karen Anne, I read those too and I was leery of the paper at first, so I checked out a sample of it in the store before I bought it. It's pretty thick. I will say that it's almost impossible to trim neatly when wet or even damp--it shreds and tears along the cut, even with a straight-edge against it. It's not all that fragile once it dries though. Charlie put the new vanity in the bathroom on Saturday (more about that later) and he bumped up against the unpainted paper several times with either his boots or the corner of the vanity. The paper's not damaged. It's odd stuff, kind of like those foam sheets you sometimes find as packing material.

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  6. Ragnar, Knotty pine wallpaper?!?! That's pretty bad!

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  7. It's possible the lower half of the walls were originally covered in beadboard. It was usually installed without plaseter or drywall under it using horizontal nailing strips.

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  8. *ggg* I thought so too when I discovered that stuff! We removed what was still clinging to the wall, but there's a spare roll somewhere - I HAD to keep that, it's just so utterly weird!

    The POs were big fans of cheap finishes, particularly walnut grained contact paper. Most of the homebrew furniture we found was built using the following ingredients: chipboard/scrap wood, 4" common nails and walnut grain contact paper. I was particularly fond of the table, which turned out to be a stool with a round board nailed to the seat :-D

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  9. Saw the latest tweet. The court system really likes to stress people out, apparently.

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  10. Whatever happened to his right to a "speedy trial"... I don't think in my state this could drag out this long... enjoy the holidays without a day that looms over your head for January at least. But this seems just wrong. If he still without a license, hopefully all this counts for "time served"!!

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  11. Karen Anne, Apparently they do!

    Anonymous, I'm glad we have the holidays, his birthday and my birthday together but it has been dragging on a long time. The trial's set for April 16th. He was arrested May 15, 2012....so almost a year. Jeez.

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  12. Jayne, I just wanted to let you know that I really enjoy your blog....I have actually spent the last few weeks reading it from day one up to this post...and eagerly waiting more. I also put a link to it on my blog at http://goingdutchcolonialstyle.blogspot.com/. Keep up the good work and best of luck with everything you are juggling!

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  13. Chelle, Thank you so much! Heading over to read your blog now. I love Dutch Colonial.

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